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Archive for September, 2016

A six-session class, beginning Sunday, October 16th, 2016 

Meeting 1st and 3rd Sundays each month  *  from 5:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

Sponsored by The Eno River Buddhist Community * Led by Callie Justice

Sessions will begin with a period of guided meditation practice and time for questions from participants concerning current challenges “on the cushion.”  Each session will also include presentations and discussion centering on specific themes such as:

  • Finding a structure to support meditation practice in your life as it is now
  • Bringing more mindfulness to your moments whatever you are doing
  • Cultivating loving-kindness and compassion while grocery shopping
  • Considering letting go of some things
  • Exploring how work with all elements of the Noble Eight-Fold Path supports the development of meditation practice

It is expected that each participant will be working with these common themes in different ways.  The focus will be on helping each individual find her or his way drawing upon the framework taught by the Buddha – not on finding one, “right way” for all.

Callie Justice is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and psychotherapist.  She began to seriously explore the Buddha’s path in the mid-1990s, and has been a Practice Leader with the Eno River Buddhist Community for over 17 years.  The teachings of the Buddha as presented in the early discourses are her primary source for developing understanding and practice. She especially appreciates the teachings of scholar-monastics such as Bhikkhus Sujato, Brahmali, Bodhi, and Anālayo and benefits deeply from ongoing sharing with good friends on the path.

Callie offers leadership for this class as a practice of dānaDāna, or “giving,” is a central practice taught by the Buddha.  In relating to others from a sense of open-handedness, freely giving (particularly in support of the growth of the Dhamma), we create rich conditions of mind and heart for the development of the Buddha’s path.  Participants will likewise have the opportunity to offer donations in support of Callie.

For more information, please contact Callie at justice.callie@yahoo.com or (919) 286-5041.

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Today, September 17, 2016, is the date chosen by the Alliance for Bhikkhunis to celebrate the establishing of the Bhikkhunī Order by the Buddha for female monastics. This year also marks the 2600th anniversary of the Bhikkhunī Saṅgha, according to Theravāda tradition, and events in observance are planned internationally throughout the year.

From the beginning of his teaching to the end of his life, the Buddha asserted the importance of establishing a Four-fold Assembly composed of female and male lay people and monastics. We are privileged to live in a time during which the Buddha’s original vision is being restored. Over the past twenty years, traditions in which the Bhikkhunī lineage had disappeared, been weakened, or was never established, are experiencing a resurgence of efforts to bring about full and equal participation of women in Buddhist monastic life.

You may like to celebrate International Bhikkhunī Day and the 2600th anniversary of the Bhikkhunī Saṅgha by learning a bit more about the women and men who have worked to bring about the renewal of the Bhikkhunī Sangha. The film “The Buddha’s Forgotten Nuns” offers an inspirational telling of some aspects of this story. It is available for viewing at: http://www.cultureunplugged.com/documentary/watch-online/play/50345/The-Buddha-s-Forgotten-Nuns.

If you’d like to learn more about the monasteries where the contemporary renaissance of the Bhikkhunī Sangha is being nurtured, the Dhammadharini website is a good place to start exploring these pioneer communities. In addition to providing a window into the life of the Dhammadharini community of Buddhist nuns, the site offers many links to other Bhikkhunī communities and organizations.

In honor of the 6th International Bhikkhunī Day, you may take inspiration from reading some of the verses composed by Bhikkhunīs who lived during the time of the Buddha. A collection of 73 of these poems taken from the Therīgāthā, can be found online at: http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/kn/thig/.

The following verses from The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha express the importance of the Four-fold Assembly in supporting the life of the Buddha’s teachings.

One who is competent and self-confident,
learned, an expert on the Dhamma,
practicing in accord with the Dhamma,
is called an adornment of the Saṅgha.

A bhikkhu accomplished in virtue,
a learned bhikkhunī,
a male lay follower endowed with faith,
a female lay follower endowed with faith:
these are the ones that adorn the Saṅgha;
these are the Saṅgha’s adornments.

© Bhikkhu BodhiThe Numerical Discourses of the Buddha, AN 4:7,  (Wisdom Publications, 2012).

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